Home > Grad School, Science > An introduction to emerging infectious diseases

An introduction to emerging infectious diseases


Viral_infections_and_involved_speciesWhile most of my research is directed toward antibiotic resistance in bacteria, the vast majority of the news in the popular media suggests that the most prevalent diseases are caused by cancer and viral agents. While concerns of bacterial drug resistance are on the rise, the fear of an influenza pandemic or an ebola outbreak creates excellent headlines.

Additionally, bacteria are relatively slow killers and infections are generally treatable (although some are not). A virus may have an incubation period of about two or three weeks with mild flu-like symptoms. During this time you may believe you have acquired the seasonal flu, and that it will pass. You hug your kids, and walk around the office touching doorhandles, shaking hands, and using the company copier. By the time you’re hemmorhaging and you realize it’s not just the flu, it’s too late, and you may have infected others.

The first thing you learn in microbiology is that bacteria are ubiquitous, but these single celled organisms are not alone in their pervasiveness. There’s a saying that for each bacterial species, there exists at least one virus that is capable of infection. Viruses are extremely prevalent. In a single milliliter of sea water, there are roughly 10 million viral particles, and about 15 times as many viruses as bacteria (a fun read). Despite the prevalence of viruses, most are incapable of infecting humans. Many bacterial infections are closely associated with immunocompromised individuals, and immunosuppression is often caused by a virus, such as HIV (opportunistic infections and AIDS).

Viral research has lead to incredible advances in medicine. Because general hygiene has decreased the incidences of bacterial caused diseases such as plague and tularemia, scientific efforts have been directed toward understanding viruses. Vaccines for smallpox and polio have saved an immeasurable number of lives. Viruses may even be key to a future cure for cancer or other genetic diseases, as viruses have been engineered as tools to deliver gene therapies (an easy to read microbe wiki link on viral based gene therapies). Hopefully I can shed light on some interesting aspects of emerging infectious diseases.

*I began writing this as a brief introduction to highlight some of the research in the field of microbiology, virology and immunology. I had too much to say, and hopefully my next post will cover this paper about how ebola evades the immune response.

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